Exotic Gardening with Rare and Strange Plants

Eccremocarpus scaber

“Summer Time and the living’s easy”

What a beautiful weekend we had here in Victoria; perhaps summer has finally arrived. Gardens are still lush, but thirsty indeed. From greenhouse to garden I live with a hose in hand. I have yet to neglect my duties this season and the garden has rewarded me absolute lushness, ever vigilant do I stand.

Today my girlfriend and I took a stroll about Government House Gardens and what it a treat it was. The sun was shining  and the wind wisped gently, shadows danced creating the perfect lighting for a great photo shoot. Government House is my favorite garden in Victoria, it’s location is perfect and it’s botanical obscurity high. Open from sunrise to sunset Government House is free to the public and a great place to relax and forget about life’s woes. Rolling gardens that surround the main building eventually turn into paths of mixed garden on a lichen covered rock face. After a walk through some of the most exciting exotic gardens in Victoria one can continue their journey to the bottom of the property to check out their preserved Gary Oak ecosystem.  The gardener’s involved in this project have a real flair for horticulture. Their attention to detail is refreshingly immaculate; the diversity of the garden lends well to much exploring. It’s worth a visit at any time of the year; surprises are in store for those who pay attention and visit often. A perfect place for a coffee & stroll.

Ok.. now onto the photos. So many colorful flowers.

Papaver Allegro
I personally don’t care for oriental poppies in my garden, but here they look ablaze and incredible. Papaver ‘Allegro’ back lite by the nodding sun.

eccremocarpus scaber
Spotted an Eccremocarpus scaber (Chilean Glory Vine) growing as happy as can be. Incredibly hardy here in Victoria if placed in the right location, a light mulch in winter and they spring to life post haste. I was excited to see this one doing so well.

eccremocarpus scaber closeup
A close up for identification purposes. Eccremocarpus scaber

exotic plants in victoria
One of my favorite plantings at Government House. An Eryngium agavifolium & Beschorneria sp. (False Yucca) thrive on this exposed rockface looking out at the sea. Lucky plants get the best view in town.

eryngium agavifolium
Eryngium agavifolium blooms

beschorneria blooms
Beschorneria blooms.

Watsonia
South African Watsonia.

Closeup watsonia

echium pininana
I was happy to see the echium pininana are still doing well.

Dying echium
All but this scarlet one of course. Having had a crop of nearly 100 last season I can say with certaintity this one isn’t going to make it this season.

Eschscholzia californica
Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy) in it’s full glorious splendor.

California poppy
Absolutely electric.

agave parryi
Always excited to see Agaves planted out here in Victoria. What a thrill, live on the wild side. Agave parryi is known to be one of the toughest agaves suited for northern gardens. Depending on the cultivar many are adapted to the wet conditions found out here on the west coast.  This one has a couple battle scars from last winter.

Eremurus
Eremurus (Fox Tail Lilies) remind me of fireworks. I really should get a timelapse on these some day, if you sped things up this would almost flicker like a sparkler. Incredible.

Fox tail lily blooms
eremurus flowers
Jewel encrusted.

Dierama
It’s no wonder why Dierama’s common name is fishing rod plant. Watch it dance in the wind, bobbing like a lure.

ID?
A couple ID’s needed pls. This is some cultivar of thistle mithinks.

ID?
Gold Star opportunity to show off your plant knowledge.

delosperma nubigenum
An impressive colony of delosperma nubigenum hanging down a rockface.

delosperma nubigenum delosperma nubigenum

delosperma cooperi
Although all Delosperma originate from Africa most and many are hardy in northern gardens. Provided they have sun and good drainage they’re an easy plant to grow and thrive on neglect. Easily propagated by cutting they come in a wide array of colors and habit. Flowers range from pink to sunset. They’re a fun plant to collect and rarely aggrivated the busy scheduled gardener. Can you say easy? Yes please!

primula bulleyana
primula bulleyanaprimula bulleyana
Primula bulleyana

Cotula
Cotula hispida

Exotic border
What’s that I spotted among this exotic border?

sonchus canariensis
A kin from my crop of Sonchus canariensis. I’m excited to see what it looks like at the end of the summer.

What a wonderful day.

P.S for those who are interested…

Please stop on by for the 6th Annual PLANT HOARDERS plant sale, in the cook st village.

A large variety of hardy & tropical perennials, old standbys and rare and exotic. Seed grown Tree Echiums (echium pininana), large specimen burgmansias, gunnera and other way cool plants. Not your average plant sale, well worth coming out rain or shine. LETS HOPE FOR SUN. Located a cook/fairfield (442 COOK), exceptional quality with fair prices. Indulge the inner plant geek and come down for some really great plants. Need gardening advice? Let me recommend something perfect for your garden.

Hello Plant People

I’ve been absent from the blogosphere, lost in the beauty of the sunny backyard garden. Too much work, a whole lot of plants, and life goes on.

Funny how an absent of writing seems to come off as missing an old friend, I love sharing stories of my plant insanity, and hope some of you are still stopping by. While June certainly had more rain clouds then sun rays, it’s moisture was well received by my water hungry garden. Although the “gardener” got a few extra days off this June, July looks like it’s going to be a hot one. Starting today is a 10 day predicted forecast of cooking summer weather, we might even see a couple days in the 30′s (In Victoria, I know, I know). My giant Echium, Tetrapanax and Ensete false banana have instantly responded to the heat, growing like something out of Little Shop of Horrors. The colorful display of spring flowers has faded and in it’s place comes a whole new wave of tropical blooms. There is still plenty of summertime curiosities to peruse and fascinate, yet another time I’m thankful for being such a plant lunatic. So much to see…

Let’s take a closer look.


The tropical border is looking lush and exotic. My Achilles heel is a large garden made up of potted specimens. A nightmare to water, but satisifying in it’s ability to be reorganized as things look their best, and fade out for the season.

Let’s look at what’s been blooming the last couple weeks.


An old standby, Echeveria glauca is blooming early this year. The first succulent to really grab my attention, it’s lost it’s initial wow factor but still manages to win my respect for introducing me to a such a lovely genera of plants.


Aloe aristata is the first Aloe in my collection to yield blooms. We dug this one out of the Mary’s garden down on Cedar Hill Road, reliably hardy in Victoria if you keep the winter wet off it. Native to the Drakensberg Mountains in South Africa, these can be found growing up to 7500 feet above sea level in their natural habitat. Hardy succulents intrigue me.


Eccremocarpus scaber (Chilean Glory Vine) overwintered just fine in a pot placed outdoors, it’s rate of growth is almost scary. A heavy seed setter, if you grow this plant for one season you’ll have plenty of opportunities to share. Bonus points that it flowers on it’s first year from seed. Plant it where it has plenty of space to climb, it breaks easily when moved and is best left to climb on it’s own.


What I suspect to be Phytolacca polyandra otherwise known as Chinese Poke Weed. I first saw this genus in Germany, and have loved it ever since. Can’t wait for the unusual berries.


You’ve got to love the intricacy of it’s flowers.


A plant gifted to me last fall by the lovely people at Scentsational Plants, Arthropodium strictum (Tasmanian Chocolate Lily) was another winter success story.  It’s been flowering for the last couple weeks with these strange off center miniature blooms.


Close up strangeness.


Standing at almost 5 ft tall, Allium giganteum was worth the trouble.


When I first saw these little white berries appear I thought my Ugni molinae (Chilean Guava) was setting an early set of fruit. I should have known that they weren’t berries but flowers, it sets it’s fruit around the end of October. Get it together plant geek!


A weed to some, the yearly return of Linaria purpurea (Toad Flax) is always welcome sight. Amazing sprays of self seeding, non obstrusive, electric purple flowers. Yes please, introduce this ditch weed into my garden any day. This plant predates my garden and plant knowledge, it’s earned it’s space whether I like it or not.


Speaking of Linarias, I recently ordered some seeds from Chilterns and this Linaria aeruginea ‘Neon Lights’ was one of them. Mixed seed in various colors, only two specimens survived due to unintentional neglect. Unsure of if it’s perennial or annual, if it seeds anything like it’s releatives, I shouldn’t have a problem keeping it in the garden.


Arisaema triphyllum never ceases to fascinate and lasts much longer then the A. griffithii I have. We all need more Jack in the pulpits in the garden.


A new plant to me, Corydalis sempervirens has minute tropical looking flowers. What sold me more then that was it’s light green, almost powdered delicate foliage. It’s shade of green is unmatched in the garden.


The Lupinus arboreus I found as a seedling on dry waterside cliff doesn’t owe me anything. Out of all the plants in my garden this spring, this plant was acquired beyond the garden center and outflowered everything and anything in the garden. Naturally a shrub, I’ve been standardizing it into a tree with great results. Burning bush is an understatement.


Lovely lupin flowers.


Desfontatia spinosa flowers remind me of candy corn. Underneith a Lewisia glandulosa teases me with plenty of buds, but I’ve yet to see a single one flower.


Another old resident of the garden is campanula persicifolia, this one in particular I suspect to be a hybrid between the white and the blue varieties in my garden. Has anyone else see a spotted campanula flower?


A potted Hymnocalis festalis (Puruvian Daffodil) is a finely crafted work of natural art. What a wispy design of white frilled loveliness. If you happen to come across one of these, do stop and smell the roses, they have an alluring perfume.


Shocked and amazed.


I probably have over 10 species of saxifraga growing in my garden, and Saxifraga stolonifera wins first place for it’s flowers. Almost like a red stemmed orchid without the prestige and hype.


Take a closer look will you.


Obscure blooms of the South American, Bomarea edulis.  This plant probably wouldn’t sell out in Garden Centers but I enjoy it’s far off tale. Tuber ordered from Sacred Succulents.


Penstemon x mexicali ‘Sunburst Ruby’ lends well to a tropical garden. It’s reds stand out amongst all the green foliage of early summer, late spring.


Mitraria coccinea is a firestorm of orange tangelo colored flowers.


On the edge or hardy? I’m still not quite decided, this one made it through just fine in the coldframe.


Verbascum bombyciferum’s phallic flower droops and hangs in a different position every evening. A great drought resistant self seeding biannual for adding height and architecture. It reminds me of a blazing candelabra.


Another side fascination I’ve had this year is collecting exotic bulbs. Aztec Lily, Sprekelia formosissima in it’s full glory wondrous glory. The very first day the flower opened I took a deep breathe in and got to smell it’s short lived perfume. Smells like citrus mixed with strawberries, the aroma was intoxicating. I went for a second smell with no return, perhaps it only produces it in small supply.


For anyone having read mylast couple posts, I may come off as a broken record with pictures of my Cardiocrinum giganteum. Still I can’t help but to feel it deserves further documentation, standing at 12+ ft tall, stury and unstaked, this is one impressive lily.


9 years for the bulb to get to flowering size, 5 days of rain to knock them all off. I took this photo the day before the storm. Cardiocrinum giganteum is so classically beautiful, a true testament to the beauty and perfection of nature.


Even during heavy winds this Cardiocrinum giganteum barely moved an inch. Check out the base of it’s stalk.


12 feet and counting = happy plant geek.


I’m still not sure if I’ve properly identified this plant, but I suspect it to be Acacia koa. This strange acacia has two types of leaves coming off one branch. The reason for this morphology is unknown to me, but it has both flat leaves and small mimosa like leaves. I’ve never seen anything like it.


A closer look.


It’s always a good time for a photo of Mangave ‘Bloodspot’


Not rare, but totally everyday. I’m proud of my soft cushion planting of Saxifraga ‘Triumph’. It’s so fluffy!


I love when groundcovers start to merge, which one will remain victorious.


A nice way to justify breaking a fresh terracotta, put some succulents in it and act like you did it on purpose.


Buddha likes the saxifraga too.


The eyes of a gentle soul. Tobius the Cat.

Wishing you all a Sunny Weekend! Thanks for joining me on this tour.

As I walk around my garden I feel an odd conflicted thought. Out of no where everything seems to be breaking dormancy, did spring show up without letting me know? While this winter has been significantly more forgiving then the last, February hit us pretty hard with bad weather. Now in the first week of March it’s as if the plants have already forgotten, the first buds have come and gone and everything is laying out the red carpet for spring. Daffodils, crocus and iris reticulata have been doing their yearly dance, pulmonaria are in bloom and the difference between sunshine and rain need only wait 15 minutes. Even though it was sleeting last week I’m happy to say spring has hit on the west coast. Some might warn that I’m jinxing it a bit, but I feel confident that we’ve made it through the worst of it. Even my textrapanex is letting me know it’s spring, it’s growing tip having survived our winter suddenly threw the switch and began to open. The last couple days has had the most pleasant warm wind blowing, day or night the temperature seems relatively the same (8-10C).

Truth be told the more I become hopelessly entwined with plants, the more aware I am of nature as a whole. The more I identify with this natural world, the less I seem to connect with people that don’t. This is where the website has helped alot, and it’s the strangest medium for connecting with like minded people. Out from the shadowed gardens of the city comes a small collective of plant crazed, excellent people. Furthermore the website has allowed me to meet people from all over the world, share some insight, trade some seeds, and maybe even a plant or two. Somehow sharing my botanical experiences via this blog enhances gardening as a whole. Afterall how much fun would it be to keep all this wonder to myself, I write this blog for you, the plant people. I digress

To successfully have a garden with 12 months of interesting plants, one needs to have at least 5-10 plants for each month of the year. No matter how you look at it, that means for a garden to truly shine you’re going to need at least 120 plants out in the back. I don’t think everyone needs to go as far as I do (I can’t help myself), but if you’re going to do something, do it right. The year is still young and I’ve already been pleasantly surprised by what’s going on outside. Let’s take a look shall we?


My Tetrapanax papyrifer did remarkably well this winter. I think a low of -6C wasn’t enough to fry it’s growing tip, and this bud remained pristine the entirety of the winter. As this is the first year I’ve grown this plant, I find it fascinating that this bud could survive such brutal conditions intact and then open in the spring.


Another gardening on the edge success story is this Dichondra ‘Emerald Falls’. Planted from a 2″ annual pot early last spring, it’s quickly made a complete circle around this large ceramic pot I have outdoors. Dichondra ‘Emerald Falls’ survived -6 w/snow with occasional protection from a sheet on the coldest nights.


My potted Wasabia japonica has overwintered just fine in the deep shade of a bamboo clump. Grown in water or above ground, the trick to this plant is protecting it from the heat of summer. For those of you with year long high temperatures, this plant is probably best admired from afar. As I think back to that faithful day when I ran around the back garden trying to save my poor heat stroked Wasabia. Growing it in water will make it slightly more forgiving, but a hot day will make it faint almost instantaneously. Don’t be scared to put it in deepest shade you have to save it’s life, that was the key to success after almost 2 weeks of watching it slowly die.


It’s elegant heartshaped leaves have an exotic lily pad look, what’s better is they’re deliciously edible and compliment a sandwich just right. “Oh that’s just a bit of organic wasabia leaf on your ham and cheese, no big deal”.


Not only is my Wasabia surviving, it’s thriving, it turns out late February / early May is the time this plant truly shines. The cool wet weather of March provides perfect conditions for the plant to produce flowers. Perhaps we’ll need to collect some seeds later in the season. If you’d like to learn more about Wasabia plants, click here for an interesting article on Dave’s Garden.


I almost lost this Tropaeolum speciosum to a insidious attack of spider mites last season. The plant thrived in the spring but in time became infested and I didn’t realize until too late. Luckily I caught it in time and saved it from almost certain demise, delaying it’s blooms until the next year. I’m still waiting patiently.


A late season score, Lavatera arborea variegata seems to be doing just fine. Growing anywhere between 5-20 feet, this biannual has some of the most amazing variegated leaves. I enjoy growing mallows and this one is certainly living up to my expectations. Classified as a biannual, growers on dave’s garden comment that you can keep the plant alive by removing the seed pods before they mature. This specimen stands at roughly 4 feet tall, with a 1 inch trunk in as little time as a year from seed.


My seed grown Eccremocarpus scaber (Chilean Glory Vine) survived it’s cold sleep under the eve of the house. Recently it started to show signs of life, pushing through the straw protection I gave it for it’s winter sleep. Truly a borderline zone 8, the mild winter was kind to it.


Lamprocapnos spectabilis (syn. Dicentra spectabilis) although common place still seems a worthy addition to the garden. A true harbinger of spring, I have 3 varieties poking up at the moment, this one in particular being one of the first 10 plants I acquired at the start of my plant hoarding career.


Every garden needs a buddha, maybe even two or three. I like knick knacks.


I’m happy to have a Hepatica nobilis in my collection, it is definitely the star of the garden right now. The flowers began to appear a couple weeks ago and are the most intense purple/blue. The buds are formed mid season, and open the following year. After it’s done flowering a cushion of fresh foliage will appear which is equally as pleasing.


Similar to an anemone blanda is looks, Hepatica nobilis flowers last a lot longer and stay open rain or shine. Lovely!


A yearlong delight and personally the nicest hellebore I’ve ever seen, Hellebore ‘Winter Moonbeam’ is at the peak of it’s beauty right now. Sunny two toned evergreen leaves, and more flowers then ever. On it’s second season in the garden, this one is really earning it’s spot.


So nice!


As I have a love hate relationship with Vinca, this Vinca minor was planted by my girlfriend in an inconspicuous spot. So far it’s remained quite behaved, and this year’s flowers look pretty impressive.


A couple slips of Bergenia cordifolia I took home from a gardening gig, rooted up nicely over the winter and have started to flower this spring. Not my most favorite plant, but it is a welcome touch of color this time of year.


I put this container together last spring and time has really been kind to it. An accidental success, I’m pleased with the plant combination.


Primula marginata has just started to bloom.


I love this combination.


Say hello to the reliable blooms of euphorbia wulfenii.


Euphorbias are a must have in any garden I create from here on out. These planted from 5″ pots 3 years ago, are certainly drawing some attention. Amazing!


Euphorbia ‘Glacier’ in mid flower.


Speaking of euphorbias, for those of you not in the know, euphorbia griffithii is completely hardy but dies down to the ground every season. Wouldn’t you know as I saw my most favorite euphorbia dry up and disappear last fall I was nervous it has succumb to my haphazard treatment of it. This spring my worries were for nothing, up came 4 new growing tips, huzzah.


Rather subtle in it’s coloring, this helleborus orientalis holds itself with a dignified elegance.


Spring bulbs emerging into spring.


The weirdest thing in my garden at this time of year, Asarum splendens has beautiful dark leaves with an unusual spotted pattern.


What’s stranger is it’s ground level stepelia-esk flowers. It seems an unlikely place for a bloom, I suppose it’s pollinators are of the bug variety, beatles ants and such.


A closer look shows a menacing bloom indeed.


In other plant related news, my amaryllis red lion bloomed for it’s second season. Sure it’s a commercial grade, everyday plant, but with good reason, the flowers are bigger then my hand. Wow!


Last but not least, my Clivia miniata is blooming. Being a plant collector sure has it’s advantages some days. A touch of the tropics.

Thanks for coming along for the tour, as usual, it’s been a pleasure.

-Nat

Mr Nat. Gardener, Plant Nerd
Tips and tales about gardening in one of the most mild climates in Canada. Specializing in rare and strange plants from far out destinations, this is the story of an obsessed young gardener in Victoria B.C. Let's create more tropical gardens in the garden city on the southern tip of Vancouver Island.
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