Exotic Gardening with Rare and Strange Plants

Today I found myself organizing the indoor jungle, things were a bit out of control. As the last hours of the day faded to darkness there I was lost in a fury of sorting, trimming, and moving. Things look significantly better now, and it’s setup in a way that everything gets what they need.


Echeveria setosa, March 12th 2011

Anyhow, on to the topic at hand. While sorting through the plants I came across my Echeveria setosa¬†¬†that I go earlier in spring. While the majority of the plants found their way outside this season, some were left to enjoy the indoor scenery, Echeveria setosa was one of them. While it seems a bit cruel to deprive a plant the luxury of summer freedom (Oh sweet fresh air), there simply wasn’t enough room for all of them. Regardless of such things, it did just fine under the grow light in the living room and rewarded me with a generous amount of side branching Echeveria pups. 12 to be exact, as I decided to clean it up a bit and replant all of the baby suckers. In 8 months the mother plant grew from a small single rosette to over 13 at nearly 3 times it’s original height. This plant is vigorous and I’d almost go as far as saying care free.

My strategy to successful indoor cultivation:
-Little to no fertilizer
-Average watering, maybe even on the dry side once and a while
-Close proximity to a full spectrum grow bulb.
-Grown in a ceramic pot, with pebbles in the bottom for good drainage.


Echeveria setosa, Nov 28th 2011

Fun Fact
Native to Mexico, Echeveria setosa’s common name is a Mexican Firecracker.

It’s amazing what a little winter cleaning does for the mind, something’s strangely satisfying about it. I must say the bonus to being a total plant lunatic is that gardening doesn’t have to end in the winter. What with over 150 potted specimens indoors, gardening is a year round gig. Essentially if this is the kind of thing that makes you happy, I’d count that point as a win.

3 Responses to Specimen Update : Echeveria setosa compacta

  • Sarah says:

    This is actually a really beautiful plant, I’ll now make it my mission to search it out. Any tips on where a girl could find it up island? (parksville/nanaimo)?

    Anyways, kudos on the site. I came across it as I’ve been searching for ideas and plans whiles I’m starting to get the garden together for the warmer months.

  • Tom says:

    I’ve never had any luck with Echeveria but your plant sure seems happy!

    I’m not sure I’d WANT to put all my plants outside in the summer, my apartment feels sad and lonely enough with 3/4 of them outside…it’d be barren with none.

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Mr Nat. Gardener, Plant Nerd
Tips and tales about gardening in one of the most mild climates in Canada. Specializing in rare and strange plants from far out destinations, this is the story of an obsessed young gardener in Victoria B.C. Let's create more tropical gardens in the garden city on the southern tip of Vancouver Island.
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