Exotic Gardening with Rare and Strange Plants

Autumn is finally upon us and summer is slowly saying goodbye. It seems like we waited forever for spring to come, and now the gardening season is nearly at it’s end. Although this will be the 26th autumn I will have experienced, it still seems to astonish me. Where did all the time go, nearly 300 days of gardening come and gone.

“I feel like a bit of a  living, breathing time machine, I blink and find myself in the future. The only problem is I can’t make it stop.”

I digress. The other day I found myself in my small greenhouse reflecting on such topics. By the time I get home, get showered and cleaned up, the sun has already faded from my back garden. I am greeted by a gentle spray of soft muted shadows and an almost instantanous calm. The garden has never looked more lush, full, and jungle like. While most gardeners live for spring’s firework display of flowering bulbs, primulas and other colorful lovelies I might be tempted to say I like late summer/autumn gardens more. The size of everything is so grandiose and developed, a 15 foot jerusalem artichoke grows more everyday. While my climate dictates that I should love plants happy in my zone, I often sway towards the tropics. These tropical tourists do much better in the heat of summer and autumn and really thrive this time of year. The only drawback to the late season garden is that is on it’s way out instead of it’s way in. Rather meaning that like a great movie you don’t want to end, it’s just matter of time before the tropical paradise fades away.

My girlfriend posing for scale under the giant jerusalem artichoke

As I sat there in the greenhouse, reflecting and generally gapping out at my cacti collection, the sun went down, and I found myself sitting in the dark at half past seven. I have been toying with the idea of  doing some night photography and this was the night that I made it happen. Plants are sometimes a difficult subject to capture. Greens on greens, deep shadows, and macro destroying breezes all stand in the way. There has been many the great plant moment that I wasn’t able to capture due to the limitations of technology. It turns out night photography of plants might be ideal, the evening offers far less distraction. I ran inside, grabbed my tripod and flashlight and off I went. Perfect black backdrops every time, it’s so simple it should have been more obvious. An hour must have passed as I looked like a total wierdo photographing plants in the dark with a flash light. My friends will NEVER understand, I’m afraid the new me is here to stay.

Now onto the photo shoot.
Night Photography of Plants: An Autumn Garden Tour.

 


Echeveria glauca always fascinates me.


Echeveria runyonii ‘Topsy Turvy’ flowers are larger then most echeveria flowers. Amazing!


Euphorbia obesa looks quite alien under this setting.


This cacti is still a NOID for me (A little help!?), but I have two of them, both have spectacular blue green tattoos. I’ve been trying to photograph this one all season with no success. Night photography does a great job.


Melianthus major is a personal favorite. Peanut Butter scented leaves, spectacular blue green foliage. Easily hardy in Victoria, don’t get stressed about it dying down to the ground, it will come back. Mine survived -15 last winter and grew back completely by mid summer. A must have in next year’s garden if you don’t have one already.


The very last flowers of my Zaluzianskya capensis (Night Flowering Phlox). This plant has the most unusual lovely evening scent. A mix of almonds and baby powder, it’s flowers are closed during the day and open at night. For more information about this plant see this post.


Just another oddity hidden amongst the rest. So unusual.


With a clever lcd lighting system, a Tetrapanax papyrifer is converted into a  bizarre night light.


As always the Echium pininana is a glory hog and still holds a large pressence in the garden. What a dramatic shadow it creates. It’s top growing point has been doing unusual things the last couple weeks. Will it flower before frost? Only time will tell.


If not it’s off the greenhouse to seek refuge and warm thoughts.


A rather new addition to the garden, Beschorneria ‘Ding Dong’ otherwise known as false red yucca. Why I felt the inclination to buy more tender plants past August is beyond me. I love the agave like foliage, awaiting it’s bizarre flowers.


The Physalis alkekengi otherwise known as Chinese Lanterns is thriving. It took two years for me to get a specimen of my own. I snagged some seeds from a yard a couple years back. The plants were slow to develop in their first year but really leaped the second. These are the first lanterns I’ve got from these plants, it was worth the wait. Interesting flowers are few and far between this time of year, a welcome addition to the garden.


With autumn comes the first flush of Cyclamen hederifolium flowers. So. Nice!

There you have it. Thank you for joining me for a late night garden tour. Who says you need sunlight to appreciate a garden anyhow!?

8 Responses to Night Photography of Plants: Autumn Garden Tour

  • om says:

    you are absoloutly un believeable, what is up with you? how could you even begin to imagine how that i’m sure makes everyone feel, your plants and plant pictures? ? hmmm?

    Stupid Garden Plants?!?!
    i came to your website looking for a picture of dagga (babysister) and for some reason Echeveria runyonii came up in my search.. ah to stumble upon sucha thing my oh my.

    i could not even save your picture (bit i will now) i’ll just have to edit it..
    will you please make a huge change to your website and callit something else andedit these pictures clean from such nonsense..?

    i like your posts otherwise, an amazing garden btw. ;)
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    in meditation you remember having thought of yourself as the personality you thought you were
    now to discover
    The frontiers of your being seem to merge more and more into the totality .

  • All looking amazing Nat and you’ve reminded me to plant night flowering phlox again. I love that scent. I’ve got eight echiums in pots grown from seed this year. Intending to plant out next spring but I’m worried that they won’t have enough time to root sufficiently to support that ridiculously long flower spike. Will they just keel over as soon as they get a little top heavy? No idea. Guess I’ll find out! Is yours in the ground or a pot?

  • Good god you sound just like me with your love for the “tropical tourists” and their late performance. I’ve noticed the center of an Echium wildpretii of mine starting to look a little odd too, I’m fearing a repeat of my Verbascum which decided to push out it’s bloom in November. Needless to say that didn’t go so well.

    Great photos btw, I especially like the Tetrapanax.

  • Dear Nat, your night photography is amazing. Love the shot of the echeveria, and of the tetrapanax night light. Believe me, Nat, time escalates more as you get older (I know — this is my 70th autumn), so enjoy your beautiful garden to the full whatever season. P x

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Mr Nat. Gardener, Plant Nerd
Tips and tales about gardening in one of the most mild climates in Canada. Specializing in rare and strange plants from far out destinations, this is the story of an obsessed young gardener in Victoria B.C. Let's create more tropical gardens in the garden city on the southern tip of Vancouver Island.
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